1st AERO SQUADRON
 
 
1st Aero Squadron
 
 
National Archives
The 16 officers of the 1st Aero Squadron pose before some of the unit's 77 enlisted men and eight aircraft at San Diego, Calif. in September 1914
From The AVIATION HISTORY Magazine
 

 
 
 
 
Edgar Staley Gorrell and Herbert Arthur Dargue
standing by plane at Mexicant front, 1916

Library of Congress Collection, 9-17-07
 

 
 
Made Record Flight in Mexico
in This Aeroplane

The Cordele Dispatch,
Wednesday, April 19, 1916
Transcribed by Bob Davis - June, 2004
      Lieutenant Edgar S. Gorrell and Herbert A. Dargue, now with General Pershing's troops in Mexico, made a record flight the other day when they went from San Antonio, into Chihuhua, to Columbus, N. M., a distance of more than 350 miles in less than four hours. They made a single stop, at Casa Grandes, where they heard reports that Villa had died of his wounds.
      Lieutenant Dargue said, "There seems to be no doubt that Villa was wounded; conversations with natives and with physicians having convinced me that he was shot through both legs and one of them being broken by a bullet, while another shot lodged in his stomach. A man in that condition without medical attention could scarcely live long.
 

 
 
RECOMMENDED READING
 
 
Dargue's Destiny
DARGUE'S DESTINY

 
by J. J. Synder
 
Product Details
Magazine: 21 pages, 8 1/2 x 11 inches
Publisher: American Aviation Historical Society
Volume 38 Number 2 Summer 1993
 
  Description:
      This article, which can be found in the AAHS JOURNAL, offers the definitive review of Dargue's life and career. The author, J. J. Snyder, has collected a wealth of information on his career and has illustrated the important events with numerous unique photographs. If you are interested in the complete story of this important pioneer aviator, you will be well advised to obtain a copy of the magazine. You can contact the Society by clicking on:
American Aviation Historical Society.
 

 
1st Aero Squadron
1st Aero Squadron
1st Aero Squadron
AEROPLANE AND TRANSPORTATION, 1ST AERO SQUADRON, FT. SAM HOUSTON TEXAS, CAPTAIN B. D. FOULOIS COMMANDING USA - 1916 -
Library of Congress Collection, 9-14-07
 

 
 
FIRST AERO SQUADRON
with the
MEXICAN PUNITIVE EXPEDITION, 1916

By Capt. Benjamin D. Foulois, Signal Corps, U.S. Army
     Herbert and many other Early Birds are mentioned in this story. You can access it by clicking on the title above.
 

 
 
ONLINE RESOURCES
     If you search for "1st Aero Squadron", using the Google search engine, (9-21-07), you will find about 1,170 links. Perhaps a good place to start is the following.
 
 
1st Aero Squadron
In Pursuit of Pancho Villa
Taking part in Brig. Gen. John J. Pershing 1916 Mexican expedition was a learning experience for the U. S. Army's first air arm--
mainly in respect to its own deficiencies.
by Gary Glynn

"The worried young pilot flew south, deeper into hostile territory, navigating by the stars. Below the fabric-covered wings of his Curtiss JN-3 "Jenny" darkness had already obscured the unfamiliar landscape of northern Mexico. Lieutenant Edgar S. Gorrell had never flown at night before, and his engine was overheating.
     The flight had been jinxed from the start. Pre-flight preparations consumed more time than expected, so the eight planes of the 1st Aero Squadron had not taken off until late in the afternoon on March 19, 1916. Not long after they flew south from Columbus, New Mexico, Lieutenant Walter G. Kilner had turned back with engine problems.
     Navigation errors contributed to the squadron's problems. Each plane carried a different type of compass, and the aviators were equipped with poor maps. Only one flier, Lieutenant Townsend F. Dodd, had ever made a night flight before."

From The HistoryNet.com

 

 
 
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