EMORY CONRAD MALICK
1881-1958
 
 
Emory Conrad Malick
 
 
Emory Conrad Malick
from
First Licensed African American Aviator: Emory Conrad Malick
To see a full size image, click on the link
 

 
 
BIOGRAPHICAL NOTES - 1
via email from Pete Jones, 2-8-11
Ralph,
I guess the history books are going to have to be updated or rewritten. In the March 2011 issue of Air & Space magazine page 14, published by the Smithsonian Inst. there is an article written by Rebecca Maksel on an unheard of Black pilot named Emory C. Malick. I'll link the article but in short he built and flew his own gliders in Pensylvania around 1910 and in 1912 went to the Curtiss Aviation School , North Island , San Diego where he took flying lessons and received a pilots license. Just from what I know pilots licenses weren't mandatory in 1912. But in short Malick predates Bessie Coleman and James Banning. A fascinating story all the same. Malick's relative, Mary Groce who sent the info to the Smithsonian, is still researching and plans to write a book.

link:
http://www.airspacemag.com/history-of-flight/In-the-Museum-The-Unrecognized-First.html

As Always, All My Best
Pete
 

 
 
BIOGRAPHICAL NOTES - 2
via email from Diane Baumann, 3-9-11
Ralph,
     Just read the information on Emory Malick. He is the son of my Great-grandfather and his first wife Susan Conrad. My great-grandfather, Darius Malick, lived in Sunbury, Pa. My Mom remembers Emory as a child, but doesn't remember him being an African-American. My Great-grandfather's first wife, Susan Conrad died and he had six-children by her. The youngest two, Annie and Cora were adopted by other families since he could not care for them, (Annie by the McCormick family and Cora by a Rev Stokes). He remarried, Lizzie Hummer, in 1888, and had seven more children, one of which was my grandmother.
     My Mom always told me that her cousin Emory was a flier and that her grandparents had an airplane engine in their basement when she was a child.
     The Malick family goes back many generations, (coming from Germany in the 1700s), and always lived around Sunbury since before the Revolutionary War. Darius Malick was a skilled carpenter for the railroad and built the house my grandparents lived in on Catawissa Avenue in Sunbury.
     Curious to know why Emory Malick is African-American. All the Malicks are white.
Diane Baumann
 

 
 
BIOGRAPHICAL NOTES - 3
via email from Mary Groce, 3-26-11
Hi Ralph,
     Diane's been in touch with me too, and we've been sharing family stories. I met her Uncle Joe, who was a big help in solving family mysteries, and who knew Emory personally. He even sent me a photo of Darius's sister, Alice Malick, who is also obviously black. It seems that no one shared that little tidbit with Diane's and my generation! In spite of all the hints, (i.e. my dark daughter and several cousins and my brother's Afro and my nose).      I'm at work right now, but I'd be glad to send photos tomorrow, if you'd like. It was a treat to get to meet Diane--I never met any Malick relatives before I found the secrets in the attic. Annie, (one of the adopted daughters), was my father's mother.
Mary
 

 
 
ONLINE RESOURCES
     If you search for "Emory C. Malick", using the Google search engine, (3-31-12), you will find a number of links. The preeminent site, built by Mary Croce just recently, is cited below.
 

 
  First Licensed African American Aviator: Emory Conrad Malick
A source of family and national pride

     "Emory Conrad Malick (1881-1958) was the first licensed African American aviator, earning his International Pilotís License (#105) on March 20, 1912, while attending the Curtiss Aviation School on North Island, San Diego, California, but his name is as yet unknown.".
Please contact me if you can help with my research on Emory Conrad
Malick and the history of aviation in the Delaware Valley, Central
Pennsylvania, and San Diego. Thank you!

Mary Groce
 
  Mary Groce
P.O. Box 523
Mt. Laurel, NJ 08054
 
  Submitted by Mary Groce  

 
  In the Museum: The Unrecognized First
Emory Malick, the first African-American pilot, wasn't known to historians until recently.

* By Rebecca Maksel
* Air & Space Magazine, March 01, 2011
     
 

 
 
 
 
"In December 1958, when he was 77 years old,
Malick slipped and fell on an icy sidewalk in Philadelphia.
He died in the hospital."
From Air & Space Magazine, March 01, 2011 .
 
If you have any information on this pioneer aviator
please contact me.
E-mail to Ralph Cooper
 

 
 
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